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LITERATURE

LITERATURE

A Toothpaste For Dinner comic

  1. IF: A FATHER'S ADVICE TO HIS SON  by RUDYARD KIPLING
  2. i carry your heart with me by e.e. cummings
  3. EMILY DICKINSON
  4. NURSERY RHYMES


IF: A FATHER'S ADVICE TO HIS SON by Rudyard Kipling

What makes a boy into a man? ( and may I add, What makes a girl into a woman?)

Courage.

Confidence.

Patience.

Integrity...

For more than one hundred years, this classic poem has inspired readers to reach for the best in themselves.

Here's a video of the poem read by Tom O'Bedlam, taken from his  Youtube Channel: SpokenVerse.  I hope he doesn't mind my using it here now. I strongly recommend his channel to everyone who's learning English and likes good literature. It's a pleasure to listen to him.


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i carry your heart with me by ee cummings

So I feel like sharing with you a beautiful poem by an American poet, ee cummings. I know you don't usually read poetry, much less in English, but I think you may like this. Like Emily Dickinson, he wrote simple poems, easy to understand. He experimented with syntax, punctuation and spelling (no, I made no mistakes: He never used capital letters). I really enjoy poets like him, I hope you do too.

So this is it:


i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart) i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go, my dear; and whatever is done
by only me is your doing, my darling)
i fear
no fate(for you are my fate, my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world, my true)
and it's you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life; which grows
higher than the soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)


ee cummings

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EMILY DICKINSON 

EMILY This is a beautiful poem by Emily Dickinson, one of my favourite poets in the English Language.
Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote (19th century); they contain short lines, have no titles, and often use unconventional capitalization and punctuation. I think that because of that they're not too difficult to understand.

So, here it is:

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.


Emily Dickinson

If you like this poem, I encourage you to read more: you can find lots of poems by Dickinson and others (with the Spanish translation) in this great blog

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NURSERY RHYMES

nursery rhymes

Nursery Rhymes are traditional songs for children in many English speaking countries. All British and American children learned their mother tongue singing  London Bridge Is Falling Down, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Itsy Bitsy Spider, Humpty Dumpty... to name a few. I don't think there is anything similar in our language: We do have El Patio De Mi Casa, El Corro De la Patata and other traditional songs but I don't think we have as many and they aren't nearly as important as Nursery Rhymes.

These songs belong to their popular culture and we find many references to them in films, literature and music. Shrek is full of them: Remember  the three blind mice? They  have their own nursery rhyme:

Alice in Wonderland has also references to Nursery Rhymes (that you can also find in the soon to be released film by Tim Burton): Humpty Dumpty is there.

Learning Nursery Rhymes is a great way of not only learning the language but also learning about their culture. If you want to know more, you can find loads of songs for you to learn on this website.

I'll leave you with a Nursery Rhyme Full of Relatives ( for those in 4th year):

This is the house that Jack built.
This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the cat that killed the rat
That ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the horse and the hound and the horn
That belonged to the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


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